Sandi Boucini & Michelle Granger - RE/MAX Executive Realty



Posted by Sandi Boucini & Michelle Granger on 8/1/2018

There’s many different myths about buying a home that may have been presented to you as fact. All of these rumors could have you believing that being a home owner is a dream. Here, we’ll debunk some of the most common misconceptions about home buying and give you the tools to solve any issues that you may come across in the process of securing a home loan.


If You Don’t Have 20% To Put Down On A Home, You Can’t Buy


Many conventional loans do require a 20% down payment on a home. There’s also many different loans available that may suit your needs. From Federal Housing Administration loans to Veteran’s programs to down payment assistance programs, there’s many different things that can be done to help you buy a home. Keep in mind that any time you put less than 20% down, you’ll need to provide additional mortgage insurance, also known as PMI or private mortgage insurance.  


If Your Credit Score Is Terrible You’re Out Of Luck

If you want really good mortgage rates, having great credit is very important. If your credit score is low, your rates tend to be much higher. A really low credit score could keep you from getting a loan completely. FHA loans allow you to still qualify for a loan with a credit score as low as 580.


You Need To Make Bank To Get Money From The Bank


Monthly annual income is just one of the factors that’s considered when it comes to getting a loan to purchase a home. Your debts matter just as much if not more. People with significant credit card debt and other loans may be denied a home loan even if they have a substantial income. 


You’re In The Clear If You’re Pre-Qualified


Pre-qualification is much different than pre-approval. Pre-qualification involves giving your lender basic information about your finances in order to estimate how much of a loan you can get. This will give you a ballpark figure of about how much you’ll be able to borrow. Of course, this is very helpful in the home search process, but you’re not done. To get pre-approved, you’ll need a complete mortgage application in order to have your complete financial background check and credit rating.  


If You’ve Met One Real Estate Agent, You’ve Met Them All


This couldn’t be further from the truth. Your relationship with your real estate agent is going to be quite close. You’ll need to share somewhat personal information in order to secure a house you’ll love. Agents are involved in one of the biggest decisions that you’ll ever make. Each agent has his or her specialties and knows different neighborhoods better than others. Definitely go with a real estate agent that you feel comfortable with and knows their stuff.  


Closing Costs Aren’t Your Responsibility


Sometimes, sellers do pay the closing costs in the sale of a home. It all depends upon how the negotiations go with the home. You’ll need to be prepared for upfront costs in buying a home. These include a credit check, attorney fees and property insurance. As a buyer, you’ll be paying anywhere between 2 and 5 percent of the purchase price of the home.  


It’s important to be prepared and to stay informed in order to make sound financial decisions throughout the process of purchasing a home. Everything will be that much more exciting when you have all of the pertinent information that you’ll need.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Sandi Boucini & Michelle Granger on 12/27/2017

Whether you're looking for your first house, a vacation home, or a retirement condo, there's always an element of excitement in finding a new place you can call your own!

Although buying and selling real estate can be stressful, especially if you've never done it before, being prepared and knowing what to expect can help keep things on an even keel.

Similar to planning a vacation or a cross-country trip, you'll want to avoid missed connections, frustrating delays, and wasted time. When it comes to buying a home, a little research, planning, and expert advice can go a long way toward ensuring a smooth journey. Here are a few specifics:

Check your credit score: Your credit rating has a major impact on your ability to successfully apply for a mortgage and be offered a relatively low interest rate. Knowing your credit rating can help you understand your options, avoid unexpected surprises, and take action to correct errors in your credit report or improve your credit profile.

Prepare a wish list: One of the keys to getting what you want in a new home is to clarify and prioritize the features that matter the most to you. Your checklist can include everything from lot size and architectural style to the reputation of the school district and proximity to stores. Some house hunters also place a high value on features like a fireplace, screened-in porch, and an open floor plan.

Find a good real estate agent: A buyers' agent can provide you with an immense amount of help in finding properties for sale that meet your specifications. They can also provide assistance, advice, and guidance on the many steps involved in going from loan applicant to new home owner. An experienced agent can also negotiate the best possible deal, in terms of price, seller concessions, and other advantages.

Meet with mortgage lenders: A crucial step in preparing to become a homeowner is understanding the mortgage application process, knowing how much banks would be willing to lend you, and determining an affordable price range. Meeting with lenders is also the first step to comparing interest rates and choosing a financial institution that would best suit your needs. Here's a helpful tip from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau: "Getting a preapproval letter helps you show sellers that you are a serious buyer – but it doesn’t commit you to a lender."

When it comes to searching for and buying a house, probably the best advice anyone could give you is "stay the course!" Let's face it: It's easy to give up, get discouraged, or settle for a home that's less than what you really want. However, when you adopt a "stay the course" mindset, you'll do a better job of staying motivated, focused, and well organized until you find just the right home for you, your family, and your future!





Posted by Sandi Boucini & Michelle Granger on 12/28/2016

Ready to buy your dream home? You'll first need to develop an effective budget. Creating and maintaining a budget remains a tall task for even thrifty homebuyers. Fortunately, we're here to help you develop a budget that complements your paycheck and helps you achieve your homeownership aspirations quickly and effortlessly. Here are three tips you can use to budget for an upcoming home purchase:

  1. Know your credit score.
When was the last time you checked your credit score? Ultimately, this score may determine whether you're able to secure a loan with a great mortgage rate, so you'll want to check it regularly. You are eligible to receive a free credit report annually from each of the three major credit reporting agencies: Equifax, Experian and TransUnion. Each report contains information that is used to calculate your credit score, and as such, you'll want to ensure all of your credit reports include accurate information. If you discover an error on any of your credit reports, you should contact the reporting credit bureau immediately. By doing so, you can dispute and fix credit report errors. In addition, you can monitor your credit score to gain a better handle on your finances. Remember, if you have outstanding credit card bills and other debt, you'll want to pay this down as much as possible. This will allow you to bolster your credit score and improve your chances of securing your dream home.
  1. Establish savings goals.
Saving for a new home requires hard work and patience. However, you can establish small, realistic savings goals to work toward buying a new house. For example, do you really need to buy a cup of coffee every morning from an upscale cafe? Or do you need the latest and greatest high-end fashion accessories to spice up your wardrobe? Simple sacrifices can go a long way and may help you accelerate your journey from homebuyer to homeowner. There are many simple ways to save money over an extended period of time. And if you create a budget and try to stick to it consistently, you can move closer to acquiring your dream home.
  1. Become an expert homebuyer.
Buying a home represents a life-changing decision. Thankfully, many great resources are available to help you find the best value for your budget. Meeting with a lender enables you to map out your budget and plan accordingly. This lender can offer expert insights and ensure you can find the best mortgage rate for your upcoming purchase. Also, friends and family members who recently have purchased homes may be able to provide valuable insights into the homebuyer journey, particularly for those who are planning to purchase a home for the first time. When in doubt, it never hurts to receive expert homebuyer advice. And with assistance from lenders and past homebuyers, you should be able to discover the best way to budget for your new home. Devote the necessary time and resources to become an expert homebuyer – you'll be glad you did! As a result, you should be able to obtain your dream home without delay.





Posted by Sandi Boucini & Michelle Granger on 10/29/2014

A foreclosure used to be a major black mark on your credit record and meant you could not obtain financing to buy another house for seven years. There is hope that if you have suffered through a foreclosure your ability to qualify for another mortgage may not be as compromised as you think. Today most buyers will only have to wait three years and depending on the reason you lost your house, the wait could be even shorter. Some potential buyers they may qualify for a mortgage as soon as 24 months after the fact if the foreclosure was the result of "extenuating circumstances". Extenuating circumstances could be a serious illness or the death of a wage earner. Things that are not considered life-changing events are divorce, a business failure or too much debt. Waiting the required time period after extenuating circumstances won't automatically qualify you for a new loan you also have to demonstrate that you can handle credit and afford the payments.